Pet insurance – is it really needed?

This is a tough question to answer, so let us explore the advantages and disadvantages of pet insurance.

Advantages

We are a nation of animal lovers, and it is our responsibility to ensure that our animals are cared for and that means in sickness and in health.  Veterinary treatment is not cheap and with advances in technology, costs continue to escalate.

Vets strongly recommend pet insurance and Medivet stressed that lifetime cover was the best since even though when your pet reaches a certain age, policies can rise dramatically. The average claim for pet insurance in 2021 was £848. Insurance policies will usually cost less than this, and you would be able to quickly access the needed cover in comparison to having to save up over a long period of time.

Having pet insurance will ensure that you never have to choose between health care and your bank account, and you will never be in the position of being unable to provide care for an ailing pet.  Owners who do not have insurance may have to make the agonising decision to give their pets up for adoption or in the worst-case scenario, euthanise their pets if treatment cannot be afforded.

Disadvantages

You have to remember that not all health issues are covered, for example, policies may not cover any pre-existing problems such as those pets who are currently receiving treatments before insurance was undertaken.

Annual boosters and neutering are not covered, neither are certain genetic conditions such as hip dysplasia, which is common in larger dogs such as Labradors and German Shepherds. Thankfully, some insurers such as British Pet Insurance do cover hip dysplasia.

Other benefits

When comparing insurance, you will find a huge spectrum of what is and isn’t covered and you may be surprised to know that some policies help with advertising and reward costs should your pet get lost or stolen.

It is also worth noting that you may find that some policies cover complementary therapy such as hydrotherapy, homoeopathy, and behavioural issues.

Savings on treatment

Having pet insurance will be beneficial if your pet has an unexpected illness or accident. However, there may be an excess you need to pay, and the cost of this can increase as your pet gets older. Do not be tempted to skip over the terms and conditions of the policy as this can be a costly mistake, make sure you are clear on what is covered and whether you are taking out lifetime cover or whether there is a time limit to when you can claim e.g. 12 months.

There are usually different levels of cover starting from as little as £6.88 per month, right through to advanced cover, which in some cases will include alternative treatment such as hydrotherapy and animal behaviour.

The cost of treating exotic pets such as Bearded Dragons, or an African grey parrot, can run into the hundreds or thousands of pounds, hence you really should carefully consider the type of care required and the potential cost.

Pet business insurance

Having worked in the pet industry for over twenty-three years, I cannot over-emphasise the importance of pet business insurance.  Whether you run a boarding facility, pet taxi service, hydrotherapy unit, dog walking or pet sitting business, you should have insurance in place.

One of the biggest mistakes with startups is failing to research your industry since the responsibility of caring for people’s pets is enormous and presents risks, so choosing the correct insurance is vital.  For example, your local authority may require boarders, be it in-house, or a cattery/kennel to have comprehensive insurance and if you employ people, it is a legal requirement to have liability insurance.

In cases where pet owners are unhappy with the standard of care provided, or if their pet suffers an injury whilst in the care of a trainer, border etc. the possibility of court action could damage or disrupt a business.

Types of Professional Insurance

Public Liability Insurance

Public liability insurance covers your business’s legal liability to a third party as a result of negligence. For example, if you were dog walking and a dog slips its lead, runs into the road and causes a road traffic accident and injures a third party.

Employers’ Liability

For a company that employs staff, you should have this in place. Employers’ liability insurance protects you and your business against the cost of any legal action and compensation claims that an employee may make if they have an injury or illness while at work. For example, you could claim if a work experience student gets bitten whilst trying to secure a dog on the grooming table whilst under the supervision of a suitably qualified person.

Professional Indemnity

This type of insurance covers your business against claims for loss or damage due to negligent advice, services or breach of professional duty.

Care, custody, and control of animals

This covers injury, illness or loss of an animal whilst in the care of your business as a result of non-negligence or negligence on the part of the business.

Loss or theft of Keys

With this type of cover, you will be able to claim for the loss or theft of keys and the costs associated with replacing locks.

Summary

On balance and especially as the cost of living continues to spiral, I would say that pet insurance is a must.  British Pet Insurance offer a wide range of quality and affordable cover to suit everyone’s budget and having pet insurance in place, offers peace of mind knowing that should Fido or Kitty fall ill, you have the reassurance that the majority of vet fees will be met and with the right premium. You can sleep safely knowing that you can provide your pet with the very best possible care.

 

Funny Fuzzy Blanket Review

We have reviewed numerous dog blankets for various pet companies, but I have to say that the heart-shaped dog mat from a company called Funny Fuzzy is really quite unique and makes a fabulous present for Valentine’s Day.

I chose the pink anthurium colour and I love its quirky design which lends itself to any modern home interior, as well as being a blanket that your dog will love.  They also do a leaf shape blanket and like the one, I have reviewed; it comes in four different colours.  Ginko yellow, elm green, anthurium pink and pinecone grey and its size lend themselves to any large pup.

It is extremely versatile in that it can be used in your dog’s car crate on the back of a car seat, or as Ellie’s favorite which is her go-to place on our living room sofa or chair.  The other bonus is that it is 100% cotton and has a beautiful luxurious touch.  I love that it is machine washable as anything that Ellie touches gets extremely grubby after a while and dry cleaning can prove extremely expensive.

Sometimes washing can stretch products out of shape, but this held beautifully and looked as good as new once dried.  As with all machine-washable products, I would strongly advise that you follow the guidelines and don’t forget to use pet-friendly detergents. This will stop any itching which may occur when using regular human detergents.

The company also recommends buying the matching donut bed, dog tepee, and the three items together which form the Sweet Dream Sleeping Set.

Funny Fuzzy is a fledgling company based in the UK and their products are all designed on basic, simple, and practical principles which stem from their years of experience in the pet product industry.

Their website is easily navigated and their checkout system is so simple to use.  I am also impressed by the wonderful internet reviews which speak loudly of a company’s reputation.

 

 

 

Find The Pug – Online Game

 

When I was approached by Plays.org to review one of their pet games, of course, I accepted.  Who can resist online games especially when they are dog-related, to while away a few minutes to break the monotony of the day!

How to Play

So basically, this game is pretty easy to negotiate in that you simply have to find the pug before the timer counts down.  The catch being that it is placed between a sea of other dogs and when the timer runs out the game is quite simply over.

The game features.

  1. You have the option to amend the countdown mode.
  2. Dogs and the Pug can easily be changed.
  3. Each puzzle can auto-generate based on frame, dimension, and the total dogs.
  4. Options include (full screen, mute sound, and an option to exit the game
  5. An option to amend the countdown mode.
  6. You can share your score on various platforms such as Twitter, Whatsapp and Facebook.
  7. An option to auto-resize the game.
  8. Includes a mouse and tap controls to negotiate the game.
  9. It runs on all platforms such as a mobile, PC, etc
  10. There is a mobile rotate instruction (Landscape only)
  11. High Definition (1024×768)
  12. You play this game against the clock so only have a limited time to find the Pug.  It sounds easy, but trust me, in a room full of other dog breeds, finding the Pug is not as simple as it sounds!

I found the first level fairly easy, but as the game progresses, the time decreases, which in turn increases the level of difficulty, so you need to keep your eyes peeled and your finger on the button.  Oh, and did I mention that the dogs get smaller while the playing field gets larger!

This game is a lot of fun and the level of challenge certainly keeps you on your toes.  It can be a bit repetitive, but great fun for the younger generation and if you know your Pugs, you will be an expert in no time.

 

 

Pets and Friends Review

Pets and Friends

I have been using Pets and Friends (formerly Kennelgate) stores, for the past thirty years, mainly when I lived in Hertfordshire, where they were based at an industrial site on the edge of the town.

The store was quite revolutionary in those days, specialising in supplying food to both commercial users and bulk food to the general public. You went through large double doors into a commercial type of property that stocked everything imaginable for your pampered pooch and small furries.  It was always a treat to amble around the shelves with my German Shepherd Dog, while my husband was busy stocking up on a months’ worth of tripe (yes tripe).  It was the recommended food of choice in those days and our dogs seemed healthy and happy on that diet.

Dog bed

When I was approached by Pets and Friends to review their Project Blu – Goa Eco Dog Bed (mattress) I was keen to oblige, since I love working with brands that offer Eco-friendly goods.

It is made from durable quality recycled polyester fabric, which is packed with recycled polyester fibre for ultimate control. I was sent the medium size for Ellie (50cm x 70cm 10cm) which is a perfect fit. It has no sides, unlike her current bed, but it is definitely preferred and within an hour of its unboxing both Ellie and our three cats were vying to stake their claim.

It has the added benefit of being completely machine washable which is a great bonus if you have dogs/cats that molt.  I would strongly recommend, however, that any dog/cat hair is removed before washing to save flushing out your machine after washing.

Cat litter

We were also sent a packet of WeCat vegetal cat litter, which we have yet to open.  For the purposes of my Instagram account, both Ellie (my Cockapoo) and Georgie (youngest cat), posed by the cat litter, which our followers mistook for dog food!  I must admit it is an easy mistake to make, given the packet’s bright and alluring colouring, although it clearly depicts two cats beneath the logo!

The company advertises the litter as innovative, since it is also made of natural ingredients of plant origin. It also inhibits the formation of bad odours and is easily disposed of in your toilet and urban organic waste.

Rebrand

The company has now relaunched as Pets and Friends after a rebrand and some of their shops offer a grooming salon, self-service dog wash, and a community hub for puppy training and general pet advice.

The company are keen to show their commitment towards the environment by reducing plastics in our oceans and I was delighted to offer this review on behalf of the echo-friendly company.

The Rise Of The Influencer

Nina and Ellie

When I lost my pet-sitting agency to COVID last year, I turned my attention to my Instagram account which was in comparison to most, is in its infancy.  I had previously been posting in the lifestyle niche, but in truth posing in various outfits felt awkward and I found myself posting less, and therefore my presence on the platform dwindled.

Losing a business that you have built up over twenty-three years can be soul-destroying and with my husband suffering from Multiple Sclerosis I needed to find another revenue source.  It was time to revisit my Instagram account, only this time I would be concentrating on the industry that was familiar to me and that was the pet sector.

The rise of technology has given experts in their field, the ability to wield influence and to affect the buying habits of others.  I had already worked with some the of top pet brands utilising my blog to pen reviews of their products, so with that experience, I changed the name of my Instagram account and When Nina Met Ellie was born.

Ellie came into my life just three months before Covid struck, so you could call her a ‘lockdown puppy’.  She was born on a puppy farm in Ireland and found her way to rescue after her right ear had been ripped in half. No doubt this had rendered her unsellable and when her photograph hit the rescue site, I had been the first to apply for her.  Following our home check, we were on our way to Wales to collect her and within a few weeks of her settling into our home, I just knew she was destined for Instagram stardom.

As an experienced blogger, I was aware that consumers were expressing a preference for ‘authentic’ trusted opinions for real pet owners rather than directly from the brands.  With my experience of working within the pet industry, I set out to find products that I personally would buy and not just those who offered the most lucrative deals.

Gone are the days when you need hundreds of thousands of followers to be a successful Influencer since brands are now getting more attuned to the power of micro-influencers and their rate of engagement.  The brands that I work with are looking for authenticity and the relationship Influencers have with their audiences while looking to build and invest in long-term relationships.  I have seen some Influencers content be deleted after a few days, whereas the content that we create is never removed.

I also like to periodically ask my followers what interests them, and which products, attire or services would they like Ellie and me to explore. My interests may not always be shared by my followers and I feel that it is important to cultivate that interaction to remain current.

I also like to engage with the brands that Ellie and I work with, in order to best understand their brief.  Although I have signed with some Agencies, communication can sometimes be diluted when the connection is broken and there is no option to speak directly to the brand. I always endeavour to create content that aligns with the brand remit and reputation and some companies will choose to vet any content before it goes live on my platform.

So, what makes a successful Influencer?  Since I am relatively new, I can only offer my humble opinion and suggest that for me, having a fresh and informative bio helped greatly, as was having a good clear picture for your bio.  If you are trying to command authority and create an engaged audience, you need to explain clearly what you do and what people can expect if they follow you. I also try to make my grid aesthetically pleasing and invite engagement with a call to action.

Recent changes to the Instagram algorithm have made it increasingly difficult to get your posts seen and at times I have been extremely disillusioned. Recently my follower count has both plummeted and risen in equal measures. I also think that audiences trust in Influencers has eroded somewhat as the market has become saturated.  I am, however, passionate about the products, attire and services that my little rescue dog Ellie and I promote since I refuse to sell my soul to the devil and be money-driven, which is why I will never promote or post anything that I would not buy myself or recommend.  Trust is a two-way street and needs equal participation from both Influencer and follower to be successful.  How To Make Your Dog Famous, and Influencer Spotlight makes for interesting reading.

By Nina Cole

Can your dog give blood?

 

When I was approached by Pet Blood Bank UK, to enquire if we may be interested in including a blog article on pet blood donation, I was eager to help spread the word.

Just like us, dogs often require blood transfusions if they are sick or injured, which is why in 2007 Pet Blood Bank UK was formed and they are the first and only animal blood bank charity in the UK.

Can your dog give blood?

 

How many dog owners consider offering their dogs as blood donors? In all my years of dog ownership, it really is nothing that I had considered before.

Emergencies that require blood transfusions

  • Surgery
  • Ruptured spleen
  • Rat poisoning
  • Anemia
  • Sepsis
  • Hemorrhage
  • Bleeding in the stomach
  • Low platelet count
  • Gastric torsion

Criteria for blood donors

  1. Your dog should ideally be aged between one and eight years old
  2. Be fit and healthy.
  3. Not be taking any medication.
  4. Be up to date on both flea/ worm treatments and vaccinations
  5. Have not previously received a blood transfusion
  6. Weigh more than 25kg
  7. Have a good temperament
  8. Easy to handle
  9. Never travelled abroad.

 

How long does the procedure take?

Once your dog has received a full veterinary check, a small amount of fur will be clipped away from the needle site on the neck. The area is cleaned and some local anesthetic cream will be applied to minimise the needle sensation. During the process, your dog will be comforted and stroked and if at any time, they seem under duress, the procedure will be stopped.  It takes 5 – 10 minutes for a dog to donate 450ml of blood.

Different blood types

Different blood types

Like us, dogs have different blood types and in the UK we test for DEA 1 positive and negative.  With only 30% of dogs having a negative blood type, keeping up with demand can be challenging.  Research by Pet Blood Bank shows that certain breeds of dogs are more likely to be negative blood type and it is these dogs that the charity particularly needs to come forward.

The breeds are:

  • Airedales
  • American Bulldogs
  • Border Collies
  • Boxers
  • Dobermans
  • Dogue de Bordeaux
  • English Bull Terriers
  • Flat-Coated Retrievers
  • German Shepherd Dogs
  • Greyhounds
  • Lurchers
  • Old English Sheepdogs
  • Pointers
  • Weimaraners

Following the procedure

Once the dog has given blood, they will be given a snack, water and time to relax. The blood is then taken to the charity’s center, where it is processed and stored until it is required.

Your dog is then presented with a red bandana to show that they have donated. A lovely touch, which when worn, could help to encourage other owners to put their pooches forward.

If you would like further details, please contact Pet Blood UK on the link provided at the beginning of this article.

Keeping your pets cool in hot weather

Exercise

There is a simple trick to help determine if it is too hot to exercise your dog and that is to remove your shoes and walk on the pavement barefoot.  If it is too hot for you, it is too hot for your dog.

Dogs can suffer heatstroke within minutes and the signs include excessive panting and collapse.  It is important to remember that once a dog shows signs like these, the damage can be already done, which is why we must prevent it.

Keeping a dog cool

  • Keep a cold damp towel under your dog if possible and keep replenishing it as it dries.
  • Ensure that he has access to cold water throughout the day, keeping it topped up at all times.
  • Only walk your dog first thing in the morning and last thing at night
  • Remember that flat-faced breeds really suffer in the heat, so be vigilant and ensure that there breathing is not affected.
  • Try making cooling treats by putting their favorite food in ice-cubes.
  • NEVER leave your dog in a car during hot days.  Open windows will not prevent them from overheating.
  • A paddling pool will help your dog cool down and what dog doesn’t enjoy a good splash
  • Provide a cooling mat, but ensure that it is purchased from a reputable store and follow instructions for use.

Hutches

It isn’t just your dog that can suffer heatstroke.  Outdoor hutches should be moved inside if possible, to a cool part of the house.  Free running on cold tiles will help them to keep cool and if this isn’t possible, move them to a shaded part of the garden and use a cold damp towel to drape over their hutch/cage.

Also, be sure to keep replenishing their bottles with cold water and check on them regularly throughout the day.

Horses and livestock

It is important that your horses and livestock have access to shade and freshwater, which can evaporate during hot weather.

Fans can be provided to cool livestock, ensuring that they receive adequate ventilation.  Sprinklers will also as a coolant during extreme temperatures.

Wildlife

Wildlife can also struggle during severe heat, so leaving water in your garden will help to quench their thirst and keep them cool.

Birdbaths are a welcome attraction for birds and will help them to clean their feathers, before finding a sunny space to dry.

Finding regular food can be a struggle for wildlife during hot periods and some wildlife trusts recommend leaving food for the hedgehogs, such as tinned cat or dog food (not fish).  Specialised food can be purchased from wildlife food suppliers, but NEVER feed them milk, since this can cause severe tummy upset.

Cats

As with dogs, cats should have access to fresh cool water.  While they love the warmth,  intense heat can see them can suffer so keep them out of conservatories.

White cats are particularly susceptible to sunburn, so apply suncream to their ears and faces and when the sun is at its strongest, keep them indoors.  They can also benefit from a cooling mat and if they do show signs of heatstroke :

  • excessive panting
  • increased heartbeat
  • lethargy
  • panting

If you are worried about any animal, please seek veterinary treatment immediately.

 

Saying goodbye!

Last breakfast

Who could have known, that I would be giving my old boy his last breakfast that day!

I had noticed a marked decline in Luika’s health and he was undoubtedly slipping into dementia, so much so, that we now worried about allowing him alone time with our three rescue cats, when only last year, their relationship was mutual respect and harmony.

The day started like any other, but as it progressed, I noticed that my old boy was reluctant to leave the comfort of his bed.  Even when the biscuit tin was rattled.  When finally he did open his eyes, they seemed dim, almost like the light was diminishing before me.  He suddenly looked like a little old man and my heart sank, as I knew that the time was coming for me to make the choice that all pet owners dread.

After lunch

I ate a small lunch and for the first time, did not have to wave Luika back to his bed.  Despite his training, we never did break that ‘please can I have some’ look at feeding time.  He just wanted to sleep

Mid afternoon and he suddenly sprang to his feet and lunged at our youngest cat, who was over in the far corner of the lounge.  It was terrifying and completely out of character.  The attack seemed to last for minutes, when in fact, in could only have been seconds and I knew immediately that I needed expert advice.  This was not the Luika that I knew.

Vets

The appointment was made for 6 pm and the drive to the surgery was done in a complete haze.  I had made the journey so many times, since it was next to our local shop, yet I remember nothing.

Luika struggled to get out of the car and needed my support into the surgery.  When the door closed behind us, I knew that he would not be coming home.

Our last cuddle

Luika’s dislike of the vet seemed to summon his strength and he had to be muzzled. For a brief moment, I had hoped that this may be a sign that he would be coming home.  I cradled him in my arms to strop his struggle and looked into his eyes, that were sunken and gaunt.  It was just like the life was already leaving him and the vet’s examination confirmed that his body and heart were closing down.

I held him tightly and while the injection was administered and with uncontrollable tears, I promised him that he would soon be free of his pain.  I thanked him for all the wonderful years that we had shared and as I felt the life leave his body, I knew that I had made the right decision.  He was gone and a part of me went with him.

Alone

The vet and nurse left the room, leaving us time together.  Just Luika and me.  I sobbed of course, for Luika and for all the other pets that I had loved and lost and when I eventually left the room, I felt utterly bereft.

Memories

Driving home I recalled our first training class together.  I had already taught him the basics, so the down stay and sit were a breeze and we came away with two ribbons and a puppy bone.

I remember the frustration with him constantly emptying our bin.  We tried every make and model, but still he mastered the lids and within minutes was tucking into its contents.

I recalled him romping in the garden with our three cats and teaching our middle cat Harriett to bark.  Yes, she can actually bark, albeit cat like.  They would sit together waiting for the postman, before their morning chorus began!

I relived his whole life in that twenty minute journey home and wept inconsolably on my return.

Euthanasia

This is the last kind act we can do for our pets.  Knowing that we can stop their suffering.  It is a decision that will inevitably be wracked with guilt, but I try to take comfort in knowing, that he is now in a better place.  I just hope that he is behaving himself up there in heaven and not leading others astray.  I also hope that God has those waste bins firmly closed, or my Luika will have the contents out within seconds and a feast will be had by all!

Travelling with your dog

Dog holding his suitcase

Brexit

There is a lot of confusion surrounding travelling with your pet if and when we exit the European Union. Under the current Travel Scheme, pet owners can travel with their pet to Europe if they hold a valid passport and if we do ever leave, as long as we strike a deal, nothing will change.

Journey check list (not by plane)

  1. Medication.  It is really important that your remember your dogs pills and a little extra would tide them over, in case your journey home is delayed.
  2. Water bowl.  If your are travelling abroad, or just enjoying a stay-cation in the UK, you should remember to keep your pet(s) hydrated.
  3. Up to date chip.  Hugely important, since if your pet does get lost, an up to date chip will inform the dog warden/rescuer, of your address and contact telephone number.
  4. Shampoo and towel.  Readiness for bad weather.
  5. Check local veterinary practises in the area where you are holidaying.
  6. Blanket
  7. Poo bags
  8. Food (water for the journey)
  9. Treats
  10. Lead.
  11. Favourite toy
  12. Brush or comb

Plane trip

  1. Always check with the airline that your pet(s), details/passport is up to date and that you have the correct documentation.
  2. Keep your pets current medical history with you.
  3. Ensure that your dog is fed and exercised before your journey.

Remember:

  • Airlines can delay or cancel your pets flight if they are deemed to be stressed, ill or aggressive.
  • Crates must be appropriately sized.
  • No wire crates are accepted.
  • Crates must have appropriate ventilation.
  • Crates must have carry handles.
  • You must have fed your pet no longer than four hours before they fly
  • A health check must be undertaken by a veterinarian and a rabies injection given well in advance.
  • There should be no lead or muzzle in the crate.
  • Dogs should be older than eight weeks old and fully weaned from their mothers.
  • Live animal should be written on the crate.

Taking your dog on holiday can be stress free if you plan ahead.  Weather your taking your dog here in the UK, or overseas, any paperwork, documentation can be organised weeks in advance.

If your going in your car, make a habit of regular stops on your journey. You will both appreciate a toilet break and the chance to stretch your legs, but be sure to keep your dogs leashed to prevent an escape.

Leaving your dog at home

Not all dogs are suitable for travel.  Some may be nervous (have a history of anxiety during confinement or travel).  Some dogs may have ongoing health problems or just too old to undergo a long journey, so you should plan ahead for your pet care.

There are all kinds of care depending on your budget, but booking ahead will ensure that your dog will be cared for while you are away.

 

Litter tray etiquette

How to chose the best litter tray

During my time as a pet sitter, I have seen a plethora of cat litter trays.  Those with hoods, large ones, small ones, the downright silly ones, self cleaning ones and I could go on!

Firstly, I would suggest that even an outdoor cat should have a litter tray.  The reason being that if your kitty is ill, or you need to keep him in, they are litter trained and able to use a tray.  It will also save on any little accidents that may occur as a result of a bad tummy.

The cat litter boxes I have attended have all, without exception, been plastic, so which does your cat prefer?  Well, unless you are Dr Dolittle, we must rely on your cats preference.  For example, kittens will be fine with a smaller tray, but an adult cat will almost always prefer a larger space to do their business.

Hooded trays provide a good degree of privacy, while others would prefer an open space, especially if you have more than one cat.  Why not buy one of each and watch to see which one is preferred.

I have three cats and three jumbo size trays.  Two are hooded, one is open and of the three, the two hooded ones seem  to curry favour.

Where should l place the trays?

I would strongly suggest that they be placed apart in different areas of your house.

Your cats need a safe and quiet safe space, so place them in a quiet corner or adjacent to walls.

Toilet sites should be kept away from areas in the home where food is prepared and eaten.  Never place them in busy thoroughfares, or near cat flaps, which could come under threat from neighbouring cats.

What litter should l use?

Of all the types I have cleaned, by far the easiest is the ‘clumping’, litter.  It is also (in my opinion), the most economical, since litter made of crystals are non absorbent, messy and a large area needs to be removed in order to clear all the waste.

I particularly dislike shredded newspaper, which some of our clients favoured.  It may be a free source of litter, but the print when soaked is particularly messy and is certainly not good for your cats.

What about litter liners?

While these plastic liners were designed to protect the tray and contain the mess of urination and defecation, in reality they leak badly from the punctures and tears.  It makes removing the soiled contents extremely messy, hence I would never recommend this type of product.

Neither do I like scented deodorants, since they are overpowering and cannot be good for cats wellbeing.

How often should l clean the trays?

I clean my cat trays at least twice a day, with a complete change once a week.

I would also strongly advise against the use of disinfectants, since they can be toxic to your cat.  Whatever cleaning product you do use, ensure that they are safe for your cat.

I hope that the above helps you to choose the best litter tray for your cat(s).  Remember that like us, each cat is different, so it may be a little trial and error until you find one that is best suited.

If you have any suggestions, please leave them in the comments below.