Tabcat – A review

Finding cats when you can’t

Having worked in the pet care industry for the last twenty years, our clients and anyone associated with our company will be aware of the importance of using microchips to help identify your cat/dog if they go missing. Indeed since April 2016, having your dog microchipped has been mandatory and anyone failing to comply with this legislation may face a penalty fine of up to £500.

Although cats are exempt they remain much-loved family members and although microchips allow us to identify our pets, they cannot help us find our beloved pets if they get lost.

When I heard about Tabcat, which comes with a directional handset, two lightweight homing tags and waterproof cases, I was keen to test it and I can honestly say it works!

Now I have three cats, two of which are cat potatoes and rarely venture out of our garden.  Ed, however, loves to roam and when we lost her for almost a week six years ago, we were completely devastated and if like us, you have a cat that likes to wonder, this could be the ideal solution.  I should mention that it was a temporary loss, for she returned after posting copious amounts of leaflets through doors and informing our local neighbours.

Collar

My main concern was trying to get her used to wearing a collar.  Being a rescue cat, she was micro-chipped as a matter of course and therefore was unused to having anything around her neck, so getting her used the device has taken time, patience and a few of her favourite titbits!

Device

We live in an extremely rural area, surrounded by woods, open fields and a forest, so it was not unusual for me to be shaking her biscuit tin each evening and calling her name like the local village idiot when she failed to return for her dinner.

Before using this device I had assumed that she was too far out of range and therefore did not hear me calling, but with Tabcat her position was easily pinpointed which showed that contrary to our belief, she rarely ventured too far from our home.

It is important that you follow the directions when first using the device, which activates a low beep when you press the locate button.  This gets louder the closer she is and I am still using the same batteries that came in the box, proving that they are durable.

Since our cat has an allotted time outside of our home, she has learned to associate wearing the collar with going out, so we no longer struggle to attach it around her neck.  We now know that her territory is much less than we thought and have discovered her favourite hiding places, much to her annoyance!

Summary

Although we have only been using this product for a couple of weeks, I would certainly recommend it to our clients.  The batteries seem durable and the device is easy to use.  I have always been impressed with its ability to locate our cat even in a garage, with a metal shutter, so it does seem surprisingly accurate.

Setting up the device took me approximately 20 minutes (assembly and syncing the unit to the the collar).  The range states 400 feet but I have yet to test its full accuracy.   In essence, however,  I would say that it is reasonably priced and works PURRfectly.   A product that I would definitely recommend.

For full details visit the TABCAT website.

#AdoptDontShop – For the Love of Jenson

Celebrity!

Why caring for a rescue dog is such a pleasure and why we offer discounts for adopted pets.

We recently cared for a beautiful little Staffie called Jenson and it turns out that this little fella is quite a celebrity! Having just received a five-star review from his owner, we have learned that he was recently featured in Paul O’Grady’s programme ‘For the love of dogs’, where he was looking for his forever home.

Dog relaxingJenson enjoying his bench in the garden.

Andi, his Pet Nanny, had already featured Jenson on her Facebook page, having become totally smitten.

He was adopted by his now owner Kate, after only two weeks fostering and at the princely age of 8 ½ is still as spritely as ever.

When Kate came to us looking for the ideal pet sitter, she explained that Jenson was adopted, but there was little information about him. She knew that he had two previous owners and discovered that he was not keen on cars, could not be left alone without destroying the furniture and barked quite a lot!

Paul O’Grady

Jenson was featured in episode 5 in October 2016, when Paul was seen taking on the role of doggie masseur. Jenson has suffered accidental, permanent scarring on his back, which had left his skin dry and itchy. Jenson was really struggling with kennel life, until he found his forever home with our client Kate who initially foster him before falling for his charm.

Both Andi (his Pet Nanny) and his owner, have both said that he is a complete star. He now loves his car journeys and has shown no desire to shred the furniture, in fact he is a glowing testament to the real nature of a Staffordshire Bull Terrier and not the demon dog that some of our media would have you believe!

There are so many advantages of adopting a rescue pet and Jenson is a shining example of the joy they bring into our lives. Not only are you re-homing a pet, you may also be saving the life of another by making room. They say that you cannot buy love, but you can buy it from a rescue centre!

Review

We would thank to thank Jenson’s owner Kate, for the wonderful review left on TrustPilot We so appreciate client testimonials and the fact that they take the time to show how much they and their pets have enjoyed our service speaks volumes about our service.

Please note our discounts for adopted pets. #AdoptDontShop

Why do dogs eat grass?

Dog sitting on grass

There are many theories as to why cats and dogs eat grass, the most common being that it is medicinal to help them vomit. However, statistics show that less than 25% of cats and dogs that eat grass are actually sick!

Most cat and dog owners have regularly witnessed them eating grass, especially in the summertime, although it is much more common in dogs than cats, here are a few theories as to why are canine and feline friends chomp on the green stuff:

Digestion

There does not appear to be any nutritional value.

Cats can regurgitate when they eat grass since they lack the enzymes which break down vegetation. This could be a way of eliminating indigestible matter from their stomachs.

Natural laxative

It is thought that grass could act as a laxative, helping your cat with regular bowel movements.

Toxic

Cat in long grass

While researchers find that grass eating is relatively common in cats and dogs, it is rarely associated to illness. However, it is extremely important that dog and cat owners are particularly careful about using pesticides or fertilisers on or near your garden plants since they can be extremely toxic.

Diet deficiency

To conclude, research has found that grass eating is extremely common that usually occurs in healthy animals and is not necessarily associated with illness or dietary deficiency.

So, these are just a few reasons why our feline and canine friends may eat grass, but there is another.  Perhaps they both just enjoy the taste!