Litter tray etiquette

How to chose the best litter tray

During my time as a pet sitter, I have seen a plethora of cat litter trays.  Those with hoods, large ones, small ones, the downright silly ones, self cleaning ones and I could go on!

Firstly, I would suggest that even an outdoor cat should have a litter tray.  The reason being that if your kitty is ill, or you need to keep him in, they are litter trained and able to use a tray.  It will also save on any little accidents that may occur as a result of a bad tummy.

The cat litter boxes I have attended have all, without exception, been plastic, so which does your cat prefer?  Well, unless you are Dr Dolittle, we must rely on your cats preference.  For example, kittens will be fine with a smaller tray, but an adult cat will almost always prefer a larger space to do their business.

Hooded trays provide a good degree of privacy, while others would prefer an open space, especially if you have more than one cat.  Why not buy one of each and watch to see which one is preferred.

I have three cats and three jumbo size trays.  Two are hooded, one is open and of the three, the two hooded ones seem  to curry favour.

Where should l place the trays?

I would strongly suggest that they be placed apart in different areas of your house.

Your cats need a safe and quiet safe space, so place them in a quiet corner or adjacent to walls.

Toilet sites should be kept away from areas in the home where food is prepared and eaten.  Never place them in busy thoroughfares, or near cat flaps, which could come under threat from neighbouring cats.

What litter should l use?

Of all the types I have cleaned, by far the easiest is the ‘clumping’, litter.  It is also (in my opinion), the most economical, since litter made of crystals are non absorbent, messy and a large area needs to be removed in order to clear all the waste.

I particularly dislike shredded newspaper, which some of our clients favoured.  It may be a free source of litter, but the print when soaked is particularly messy and is certainly not good for your cats.

What about litter liners?

While these plastic liners were designed to protect the tray and contain the mess of urination and defecation, in reality they leak badly from the punctures and tears.  It makes removing the soiled contents extremely messy, hence I would never recommend this type of product.

Neither do I like scented deodorants, since they are overpowering and cannot be good for cats wellbeing.

How often should l clean the trays?

I clean my cat trays at least twice a day, with a complete change once a week.

I would also strongly advise against the use of disinfectants, since they can be toxic to your cat.  Whatever cleaning product you do use, ensure that they are safe for your cat.

I hope that the above helps you to choose the best litter tray for your cat(s).  Remember that like us, each cat is different, so it may be a little trial and error until you find one that is best suited.

If you have any suggestions, please leave them in the comments below.

 

 

 

 

 

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