5 Christmas Gifts For Your Dog

Bling & Sparkle

If you are looking for a little bit of bling and sparkle for your dog/cat this Christmas, look no further than these beautiful rhinestone collars/pet jewellery that will certainly not break the bank.

The large size start at £9.00, with the small costing as little as £7.00 and can be purchased from our very own store at Nina’s Nannies for Pets.

It is wise to remember however, that these collars are not to be used with a lead.

Ruffle Snuffle Treat Ball

We love this treat ball, since it has been created to provide enough of a challenge, but deliver rewards quickly to your dog.

It is made entirely from fleece so no rubber to chew in the middle.

It is also machine washable for easy cleaning.

Again, very reasonably priced at £5.50 and can be purchased from Ruffle Snuffle

Tetford Chesterfield in Heather Tweed

This is one of the most expensive Christmas offerings, but it has been hand crafted and made of the finest Heather Tweed. They really are a quality dog bed, that will fit into anyroom.

Retailing at between £350 – £528.00 this is a product to last and can be found at Lords and Labradors.

 

 

Kong Balls

This is a must toy for everyone with larger breeds, such as Staffordshire Terriers and German Shepherds.

These are the best bouncing and most durable balls on the market and perfect for the dog that loves to fetch and chew.

Made from Kong’s classic durable rubber they come in various  sizes, small, medium and large and retail at approximately £10.49 for the small, depending on where you buy them.  We found some on Amazon that start at £6.00

Dog Coats

Last but not least comes the classic dog coat and if you really want to splash the cash on your pooch this year, what about this quilted little number straight from Harrods!

As you would expect from a high end retailer, these are quilted Barbour coats which come in all sizes, from the tiniest, to the giant breeds.  As you would expect, they do not come cheap and start from £44.94 for the tiny size.

It boasts a slick quilted design, classic corduroy collar and adjustable buckle, with a Velcro closure for easy fastening.

You can find them on Harrods main site.

We hope you have enjoyed our five suggested dog gifts for Christmas and whatever the size of your budget, there is something for every purse.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rescue Dogs / Bringing a Rescue Dog Home

Bringing a Rescue Dog Home

There is nothing quite so rewarding as rehoming a shelter dog and with  thousands in rescue centres up and down the country, not only are you offering them a loving home, but you are also making room for another dog who is equally deserving.

Under resourced

Rescue centres are under resourced and often overcrowded and some shelters only have a limited time before euthanasia is considered.  Older dogs and those will health issues are often overlooked and it is they that are most likely put to sleep if homes cannot be found.

What to consider before adopting

Taking on any dog is a huge commitment and taking on a rescue dog can be a little more challenging.

The majority of dogs end up in rescue through no fault of their own.  Breakdown of marriages, moving overseas, ill health of their owners or in some cases, they just may not go with the furniture.  Yes it can be as heartbreaking as that!, but in some cases dogs can have been left alone for long periods of time and have therefore developed some issues, but nothing can cannot be overcome.

Things to consider

If you live in rented accommodation, you should first check the terms and conditions of your lease.

  • Does your landlord allow pets
  • Is your home pet friendly
  • Do you have an adequate exercise area
  • Are you at work each day and if so, can you afford the expense of a dog walker each day
  • Vet fees.  Veterinary care can be expensive, but necessary when your pet(s) become ill

A good rescue center will undertake a home visit to check that your house is a suitable environment and you will need to consider that some dogs may not have been house trained meaning that your carpets may become soiled and your furniture may be at risk until they are fully trained.

Which rescue centre to choose

There are rescue centres up and down the country, but it is important to choose the right one.

Reputable shelters will:

  • Give each dog a health check before being collected
  • Be neutered or spayed
  • Vacinanted
  • Evaluate your circumstances and suitability
  • Match you to a suitable dog
  • Provide guidance and support if required

The decision to take on any dog should be considered carefully and the whole family should be in agreement.  By rehoming a rescue dog you are taking on their history and they must be given time to adjust.

Dog ownership in an enormous responsibility.  You are also offering the dog a second change at happiness and deserve to be rehomed in an environment where they will be loved and cared for and they will reward you a thousand fold.

 

 

 

Which pet is best for me?

So you have taken the decision to welcome a pet into your family for the first time, so what pet is best for you?  Little four-year-old Peter is desperate for that beautiful fluffy bunny he fell in love with in the pet store window, while five year old Mandy has been pleading for a little kitten just like her friend Abigail’s.  Decisions, decisions, what do you do?

Pet ownership is extremely rewarding and I have long been of the opinion, that animal welfare should be part of the school curriculum, but back to the question in hand.

Please do NOT buy or adopt on impulse and do your research before welcoming any animal into your home.

At Nina’s Nannies for Pets, we are keen advocates of #adoptdontshop and would always suggest visiting your local animal shelter.  Pet stores are biased to selling their animals and in my opinion, are not best placed to offer the advice required, such as dietary requirements, socialisation and the correct feeding.  In my capacity as a pet sitter, I have seen countless Rabbits, Guinea Pigs and small furries (with the exception of Syrian Hamsters), being sold separately. This is heartbreaking given that those mentioned are community animals and should never live alone.

Over the eighteen years I have been in business, I have shuddered at the inappropriate housing of some animals in our charge, such as tiny Rabbit hutches with little space for them to maneuver, Chickens kept in tiny pods which are completely inadequate, even for the pets for which they were intended and Ducks with just a bowl of water in a small garden.

Impulse buying

When buying or adopting any pet, this should be a thought out, will prepared process.  If in doubt ask a pet professional such as a vet, or visit the Blue Cross/RSPCA website, which are awash with information about all manner of pets.

Consider your home circumstances.

  • What size is your garden?
  • Do you work all day?
  • Finances-can you afford the expense of owning a pet?

Which pet

In order to decide the above, you should consider your reasons for wanting a pet.  If it is primarily for your children, I would look to the small furies such as rabbits, guinea pigs or another hutch/cage dwelling creature.  My particular favorite are fancy rats.  Of all the little furries, fancy rats are by far the most intelligent.  They are extremely affectionate little creatures and far happier if kept in pairs.

As with all pets, please consider adopting, but if you really want a pair of young rats ensure that you go to a reputable breeder.

If you are looking for a more energetic companion, then of course a dog would be ideal.  However, if you work all day and require a more independent addition to your household a cat would be a purrfect fit.  Again, there are dogs and cats of all ages and sizes in rescue centers up and down the country, but if it is a pure bred that you desire, PLEASE, ensure that you chose a reputable breeder and remember to:

  1. Never buy from a pet store or answer an advert in the local paper. These are often the window for puppy mills and should be avoided at all cost.
  2. Remember that the Kennel Club provides details of accredited breeders with registered puppies for sale and look on their website for contact details.
  3. A good breeder with be happy to welcome you to their home, where you can see mum interacting with their puppies.
  4. Ask the breeder for the KC registration certificate and worming information. A good breeder will ask their own questions and their premises will be clean and the dogs happy.

A good breeder will always do the following:

  • Health test their breeding stock
  • Take excellent care of their dogs
  • Provide information and follow up care for those people buying their puppies
  • Offer a lifetime of support to those who buy their puppies
  • A good and considerate breeder, will have no more than three litter from a female in her lifetime and steer clear of any breeder who has different breeds of dog.

If you are still unsure, contact The Kennel Club who will be only too pleased to help.

I would strongly advise that your children are totally committed to caring for pet, since forcing a child into pet ownership will not teach them responsibility and you should be prepared to do all the caring yourselves.

Cost

Animals should be for life and not just an impulse buy.

Apart from the initial cost of buying your pet, be it from a store, breeder or shelter, pets are a huge financial commitment.

They have dietary requirements, suitable housing, grooming, holiday care and most importantly, health care.

Insurance is vital to the well-being of your pet and some can live for many years.  The average lifespan of a cat is around 12 – 14 years and we have cared for some who have reached 20 and above!

Small furies

Rabbits, mice, gerbils and rabbits make wonderful pets, but they need to be handled regularly.  Rats especially, make wonderful companions for small children, since if socialized they are extremely interactive and affectionate, in fact  I liken them to little canines in a rodent form.

All furies require regular cleaning and for some children this can be monotonous once the novelty of pet ownership has worn off.  In this case, parents must be prepared to carry out these duties and where possible encourage children to continue with their routines.

Rabbits in particular can fall prey to the dreaded fly strike, a truly gruesome condition which occurs when flies lay their eggs on the rabbits rear ends.  It is therefore imperative that their living quarters are kept clean and they are checked daily, especially during the summer months.

Dogs/Cats

The above are the most popular choice of pets, with thousands of families welcoming them into our homes.

The majority of dogs are both loyal and affectionate, forming close bonds with their owners.

When choosing a dog, you should insure that he/she is the right breed, type for your family, which is why it is so important that you research your breed before making your decision.

Puppies and kittens need a lot of training and socialisation and may not be appropriate for young children.  Adopting a calm friendly adult dog/cat however, who has been temperament assessed, may be a far better companion for your family.  

As with all pet/child introductions, it is so important that you help your child to see the world through their eyes.  Children would react if they were poked or prodded unexpectedly, so you should explain that animals must be treated with respect and kindness.

So have you done your research?  If so, which pet did you get and did you adopt?

 

 

 

Pup Aid

When I received an invite from Marc Abraham to attend Pup Aid this year, I did so without hesitation. Many of our clients have unwittingly purchased dogs/kittens from puppy farms and I welcome any opportunity to raise awareness of these appalling concentration camps.
Being used to early starts, we set off for London at 6.15am, with our car piled high with the equipment,  required to set up our temporary camp on Primrose Hill. London has always filled me with horror, since my last encounter driving around the city . So lost was I, that I ended up with a police escort who had answered my frantic pleas of help. I was much younger then and have long since lost my ability to catch the eye of a passing policeman!   I was therefore reliant on my trusted Sat Nav, who thus far had always helped me to reach my destination.
The next hour was spent making friends and setting up our marquee – not an easy task and I would like to thank the two lovely gentlemen from Primrose Hill Bookshop, without whom our marquee would never have made it out of the bag!
As passionate animal welfare advocates, we are always keen to raise a little money on the day and Pup Aid was no exception. Our wonderful twitter friends had donated all manner of doggie toys, treats, training aids and even a doggie bed, which was carefully positioned in front of our stall to attract public attention. We had hoped to raise at least £100 for the pup aid cause and we were not disappointed. People were extremely generous in their donations and over £130 was raised at the end of the day, so a huge thank you to everyone from Primrose Hill who supported such a good cause.
The event was well attended by the general public and even the VIP’s came out in force. It was lovely to meet some of my twitter friends including the lovely Leean Pindar from http://lovesniffys.com/ and my favourite VIP Peter Egan, whom with his wife Myra, work tirelessly in their support of animal welfare.
The day was a resounding success and I would like to thank Marc Abraham on behalf of animal owners everywhere, for his efforts in bringing the misery of puppy farms to an end.
Marc and everyone from Pup Aid still need your support with their petition to close down these barbaric puppy farms, so PLEASE sign and share http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/49528